Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Approves Changes to Shortfin Mako Regulations

Commercial harvest is prohibited in state waters due to recent changes to federal rules

At its July meeting in Stuart, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved changes to how shortfin mako are managed in state waters. Effective Jan. 1, 2020, the minimum size limit for recreational harvest will increase from 54 to 83 inches fork length.

(FWC) – At its July meeting in Stuart, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved changes to how shortfin mako are managed in state waters.

Effective Jan. 1, 2020, the minimum size limit for recreational harvest will increase from 54 to 83 inches fork length.

This size increase is required by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to provide consistency with recent federal changes.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said shortfin mako is overfished and undergoing overfishing, and these measures are a part of ongoing international efforts to help rebuild the resource for a sustainable fishery in the future.

Commercial harvest is prohibited in state waters due to recent changes to federal rules.

An average adult specimen measures around 10 feet in length and weighs 150 to 300 pounds.

The shortfin mako is on record as the fastest-swimming shark, capable of bursts of speed up to 60 miles per hour. The species is classified as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Learn more about shark regulations at MyFWC.com/Marine by clicking on “Recreational Regulations” and “Sharks.”

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